Swinney

Game Changing Frankland River Born from Meticulous Farming Practices

The road from grape grower to winemaker can be fraught with difficulties. Yet, by building from the vineyard first, employing a dream team of passionate and experienced people, and never taking the focus away from quality, siblings Matt and Janelle Swinney have created something exceptional in the Frankland River region of WA.

It’s one thing to aim for the stars; it’s quite another to have the tools to get there. Matt Swinney had a powerful vision to establish a benchmark and unique vineyard on his family’s property, situated on the gravelly, ironstone soils of the Frankland. His intention was always to found a benchmark wine label using only the finest fruit, but good things take time—especially when it comes to vines! Most plantings occurred in 1998, and the site quickly garnered a reputation for quality and originality. Innovations such as planting bush vines (the first in modern-day WA, where they are virtually unknown) and taking the leap with Grenache and Mourvèdre (in a region that many felt was too cool for these Mediterranean varieties) certainly raised eyebrows. Today, both these decisions have proven to be inspiring.  

Fast forward to today, and the Swinney estate has become regarded by many as the finest Shiraz vineyard in WA, not to mention an excellent source for Frankland River Riesling. They have also staked their claim (pardon the pun!) as one of the world’s great sites for both Grenache and Mourvèdre—if you think we’re exaggerating, then we look forward to showing you the upcoming releases. More recently, in 2018, the Swinneys invited renowned winemaker Rob Mann to join the team. Mann is the grandson of the legendary Jack Mann—the godfather of Western Australian wine—and is internationally respected in his own right after his work at Cape Mentelle, Hardy’s Tintara and Newton in the Napa. By his own account, Mann took one look at the vineyard and asked, “Where do I sign on?”

“The Swinney vineyard represents modern viticulture interwoven with Old-World techniques, executed with precision through a combination of exhaustive manual work and state-of-the-art technology, and all underpinned by an environmental focus...and the quality of the resulting wines, is truly extraordinary and inspiring.” Young Gun of Wine – Australian Vineyard of The Year 2020

The Swinneys have been no less careful about who they entrusted their vines. Following celebrated viticulturist Lee Haselgrove’s tenure, in 2021 Rhys Thomas joined the team as viticulturalist and vineyard manager. A long-term buyer of Swinney fruit, Thomas has been walking the blocks and rows of the Swinney vineyards for over 15 years and was a leading force in the family’s drive towards pure quality and sustainability. His soil and aspect-driven approach will only further help peel back the layers of the Swinny’s outstanding terroir.  

Over the last handful of vintages, the Swinney label has been celebrated by critics worldwide in a way that is most unusual for such a young producer. Despite their sizeable holdings, the Swinneys produce very limited volumes of their own wine, cherry-picking a tiny percentage of their parcels for their own production. These vines are micromanaged to deliver the very finest and most expressive fruit they can grow. Mostly dry-farmed, the Swinney parcels are low cropped (at one to two tonnes per acre), and the canopy management is meticulous. There’s shoot and bunch thinning and shade cloth for the Shiraz and Riesling fruit, creating soft, dappled light and lower temperatures in the bunch zone. In the case of Grenache, the vines are harvested three times to pick only perfectly ripe fruit. Even then, the fruit is further graded depending on the wine it’s destined for. It’s an obsessive style of viticulture, and it shows in the wines.

The winemaking philosophy here is equally precise yet straightforward. Both Mann and the Swinney family want to reflect and preserve the personality of each individual vineyard site in that season. They want people to be reminded of the place rather than the maker. After careful sorting, fermentations are natural; Robb Mann also favours co-fermentation and the flavour and structural integration this brings. Gravity flow is utilised to avoid pumping, maximising the percentage of whole berries and minimising maceration. Mann is looking for an infusion-style, gentle extraction, and this approach goes a long way to explaining the remarkable balance and purity of the wines. The reds are aged in mostly seasoned wood, ranging from 500-litre demi muids to 36-hl wooden vats. The resulting wines are outstanding and shine with character, craft and respect for the land.

Swinny’s Farvie label represents the finest quality and purest vineyard expression from the family’s best, organically managed sites. These are wines made from specific vines and bunches, farmed in the kind of obsessive fashion that we associate with the most outstanding growers worldwide. The Farvie vines are rooted in the deep, gravelly, ironstone crests of the Swinney Estate’s upper, northeast-facing hillsides. The vines are exposed to the cool breezes off the river, and the prevalence of rusting lateritic gravel in the soil allows for excellent drainage and deep access to moisture. This specific soil type and aspect has been identified as delivering the purest earth-to-glass expression (described by winemaker Rob Mann as a ferrous or bloody note) and also providing purity, restraint and a noble tannin profile. Both the Grenache and the Shiraz are stimulating, cutting-edge wines born from skilful and fanatical farming practices.

The Range

Swinney Syrah 2022
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Swinney Syrah 2022

Over the years, Rob Mann has been steadily increasing his use of whole bunch in his red wines. This is especially true for his Syrah. By now you will know that this is a vigneron that seeks freshness, spice and structure in his reds—features he finds heightened in Syrah through careful use of whole bunches. Swinney’s 2022 Syrah was hand-harvested from select parcels planted to a range of clones, including 470, Waldron and Jack Mann’s heritage mass-selection Syrah. Unlike the Grenache and Mourvèdre, the Syrah is trellised—although there are plans afoot for some single-stake Syrah in the future. In the warmer conditions of 2022, Swinney’s shade cloth played a pivotal role, creating soft, mottled light to protect the skins and lower the temperature in the bunch zone as well as preserving freshness, spice and varietal and regional typicity in the fruit.In the winery, the berries were sorted and emptied into small wooden and stainless-steel fermenters via gravity. A well-integrated 28% whole-bunch component was included to build structure and texture, providing a robust frame for the lustrous Shiraz fruit. The 2022 spent 12 days on skins before being pressed directly to fine-grained, 600-litre demi-muids (7% new) for 11 months.

“Inky crimson-purple colour. Dark spice and brooding intensity with mulberry, Chinese five spice and squid ink. Medium- to full-bodied with saturated blueberry, satsuma plum and black pepper. Incredibly youthful and expressive with layers of flavour and texture underpinned by a fleshy, mouthcoating tannin structure carrying the fruit and spice into an enduring finish.” Swinney

“I looked at this over the course of 24 hours and fair to say that it transformed remarkably over that time. I wasn’t much of a fan on day one, so much so that I asked Gary to take a glance at it as well, which resulted in him using the descriptor “blood lip”, which was not only evocative, but deadly accurate. Blood lip. This wine tastes of blood and rust and iron. It’s a medium weight wine, smoky, meaty, sweet with roasted nut characters, peppery through the tannin as much as through the fruit, juiced with plum and red cherry but, as mentioned, bloody with it, ferrous, rusty, distinctive. It’s a dry wine, almost drying, but yet lengthy, and complex in shape as much as in flavour. In truth I disliked this wine, and then loved it. I’m not sure how that’s possible for the one same wine, but over the course of a day it was. As a result I’m recommending this wine, I think it’s excellent, but I’m also suggesting that it be given a decent-length decant.”
94 points, Campbell Mattinson, The Wine Front
“This is part of a triumvirate of wines that showcases the vineyard and winemaking that have crafted these super wines. This is not your fruit bomb Aussie shiraz. This is syrah and there is more than a little Old World style here. The fruit shows an almost luminosity that bursts from the glass. The palate picks up the vineyard characters with its ironstone gravelly rusty characters complementing the bright red fruits. You sense vineyard here with a deft touch of the winemaker simply coaxing a little more out of it.”
96 points, rayjordanwine.com.au
“A fine, mid-weighted syrah, reeling off scents of charcuterie, peony, lilac, clove and blue-fruit allusions, set in relief against a noble structural edifice. The tannins, often the masterstroke at this address, placate and suppress any stray fruit sweetness. Lovely strident tannins, doused in mace. Another wine to bury in the cellar for eight years or more, although drinkable now with a brisk decant. Screw cap.”
94 points, Ned Goodwin MW, jamessuckling.com
“Dense, dark, inky and very youthful in the glass. Bright and lively aromas of blueberry, anise, graphite, pot-pourri and smoked meats. There's a touch of reduction as well. Firm, youthful, sinewy and crunchy on the palate. Lashings of blue fruits, iodine, anise, spice and ferrous earth. Tannins are really firm, acidity is snappy and there's again, a touch of reduction running through the wine. It needs some air.”
93 points, Aaron Brasher, The Real Review
Swinney Syrah 2022
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Swinney Farvie Syrah 2021
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Swinney Farvie Syrah 2021

The Farvie is a remarkable expression of Australian Shiraz and puts Western Australia back in the conversation regarding benchmarks for this variety. Only a selected area of soil in both the Wilson’s Pool and Powderbark blocks is earmarked for the Farvie Syrah, with the vines fostered in a way that nourishes and balances the fruit to optimum levels allowing for dry farming. Unlike the Swinney label—which is drawn from a range of clones and massale selections—the Farvie parcels are home only to a range of massale-grown vines, including Jack Mann’s Houghton massale selection. In case you didn’t know, Jack Mann was winemaker Rob Mann’s grandfather. Unlike the bush-vine Grenache and Mourvèdre, the Syrah is trellised, although there are plans to plant single-stake Syrah in the future. The vines are meticulously managed, and the fruit is sorted in the vineyard and winery. Although Frankland River is cool-climate continental, Swinney also uses shade cloth for the Shiraz on the western side, creating a soft, mottled light to protect the skins and lower the temperature in the bunch zone. The wines made from this western pick present darker colours, lower alcohols and more perfume, alongside extra freshness and vibrant fruit character. Rigorous shoot positioning and bunch selection further refine the unique expression so critical to the personality of this fruit. Picked twice—on the 24th and the 30th of March—and sorted berry-by-berry in the winery, this year Rob Mann incorporated 58% whole bunches to promote ethereal structure and a lightness of texture while also encouraging the bright and spicy aromatics. Everything was gravity-fed to a French oak vat and two demi-muids for wild fermentation. The wine spent only 12 days on skins before being basket-pressed directly to fine-grained, large-format, seasoned French oak, where it rested for 11 months before bottling.Multiple critics have heralded the Farvie Syrah as the best of the best in Western Australia. Yet the quality of this label tells us Swinney’s ambitions aim further afield than the Indian Ocean to the west and the Nullarbor Plain to the east. They believe they have the site and the practice to rival the world’s most unique and authentic expressions of Syrah. A lofty goal indeed, but one Swinney is well on the way to achieving. Perhaps they already have. From a dream year for Frankland Syrah, it’s a wine with all the purity, depth and perfume we have come to expect from a Farvie Syrah, and then perhaps a little more; here, there is a fineness, intricacy and detail, not quite so apparent in the warmer and dryer years. It’s a wine that belongs on the finest wine lists and cellars nationwide. 

“The 2021 Farvie Syrah is lighter and finer than the Mourvèdre, yet it is darker in the glass and more mouthfilling. I suppose, in some ways, the flavour profile here is more expected, yet the tannic structure of the thing is more refined and sleek than I have seen in previous vintages. There are notes of blackberry, star anise, iodine, blueberry, licorice and a slash of bone broth. It also has black pepper and aniseed, but not in the warm-climate framework that we are used to seeing/experiencing from regions like Barossa or McLaren Vale. It is odious to compare, I concede, but important from a contextual standpoint. This is Frankland, with its own signature. It is a profoundly elegant wine now, but it will only be better, more complex, more svelte and more complete as time wears on.” 97+ points
97 points, Erin Larkin, The Wine Advocate
“Deep red with a good tint of purple and a vegetal overtone to the richly dark-fruited aromas. There is pepper and assorted spices and clear suggestions of whole-bunch fermentation. Fine, emery-like tannins complete the picture. Good balance and length: a shiraz of some elegance as well as stature, deserving the title of syrah. Long, long aftertaste.”
95 points, Huon Hooke, The Real Review
"Refined, smooth, timeless and cultured, this is a stellar interpretation of this noble grape, and it perfectly conveys its character with magnificent control and uncommon immediacy."
19 points, Matthew Jukes, matthewjukes.com
“Farvie represents the upper echelon of fruit and winemaking at Swinney. Succulent, medium-bodied red of suede texture, bright, red berry fruit characters, a thread of crushed granite minerality and soaking of liquid brown spice. Super-fragrant with all that clove, cinnamon and garam masala perfume lavishly dusted on raspberry and cranberry fruitiness. The palate flows beautifully and long, more of the red berries and of course the follow-through of brown spice. Tannins thread tension and grip through the wine, the finish all that minerality and a growing pucker. Refined and definitively 'syrah' over shiraz. A beautiful and individual expression.”
95 points, Mike Bennie, Halliday Wine Companion 2024
Swinney Farvie Syrah 2021
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Swinney Mourvèdre Rosé 2023 (1500ml)
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Swinney Mourvèdre Rosé 2023 (1500ml)

How do you follow a wine described by Erin Larkin as “one of Australia’s greatest rosés”; by Huon Hooke as “a super-serious rosé of character and intent”, and by Decanter as a rosé of “complexity and restraint”? For sure, the pressure was on for Rob Mann to back up last year’s inaugural release. And deliver he has. From a year that Mann describes as stellar, this year’s release holds all the poise, complexity and detail of the 2022—and then some. The season’s cool, fresh, vibrant signature is writ large, bringing balance to a tick-up in weight, texture and savoury nuance. There’s a lot of wine in the glass—it’s potent, punchy and lightly spiced—yet also a great deal of finesse and structure, and like the great Rosé wines of France, it will shine all the brighter with food (and even a little bottle age). This year's blend is Mourvèdre (86%), Grenache (10%) and, as per last year, a refreshing splash of Vermentino (4%). The lion’s share is drawn from dry-grown bush vines on the Powderbark vineyard’s ironstone gravel hilltop. With a focus on freshness, the fruit from these vines was picked with the potential alcohol sitting between 12.5 and 13 degrees—when the fruit is on the cusp of full maturity. The Mourvèdre was then pressed using a traditional, ultra-light Champagne cycle alongside a small percentage of bush-vine Grenache and a splash of Vermentino to bring subtle complexity and reinforce the freshness. The wine then rested on its lees for three months in neutral French oak. “On the notes - fresh fruit characters of strawberry and rose water combine with subtle complexity, including beeswax, Szechuan pepper and oyster shell. Textural and full-flavoured on the palate, yet finely balanced with a mix of rhubarb and pomegranate combined with fresh curd.  The finish is soft with refreshing pithy acidity and a bone-dry, briny finish.” Rob Mann, Winemaker

“On the notes - fresh fruit characters of strawberry and rose water combine with subtle complexity, including beeswax, Szechuan pepper and oyster shell. Textural and full-flavoured on the palate, yet finely balanced with a mix of rhubarb and pomegranate combined with fresh curd. The finish is soft with refreshing pithy acidity and a bone-dry, briny finish.” Rob Mann, Winemaker

“Perhaps it was inevitable that a stunning rosé would emanate from the celestial Mourvèdre vines at the Swinney vineyards in Frankland River. Well, this is it – and it is nothing short of breathtaking. I have never tasted a finer Australian rosé, and it is all the more gripping that it is not made from Grenache!”
Matthew Jukes, The Buyer
Swinney Mourvèdre Rosé 2023 (1500ml)
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Swinney Mourvedre Rosé 2023
Swinney Mourvedre Rosé 2023
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Swinney Mourvedre Rosé 2023

How do you follow a wine described by Erin Larkin as “one of Australia’s greatest rosés”; by Huon Hooke as “a super-serious rosé of character and intent”, and by Decanter as a rosé of “complexity and restraint”? For sure, the pressure was on for Rob Mann to back up last year’s inaugural release. And deliver he has. From a year that Mann describes as stellar, this year’s release holds all the poise, complexity and detail of the 2022—and then some. The season’s cool, fresh, vibrant signature is writ large, bringing balance to a tick-up in weight, texture and savoury nuance. There’s a lot of wine in the glass—it’s potent, punchy and lightly spiced—yet also a great deal of finesse and structure, and like the great Rosé wines of France, it will shine all the brighter with food (and even a little bottle age). This year's blend is Mourvèdre (86%), Grenache (10%) and, as per last year, a refreshing splash of Vermentino (4%). The lion’s share is drawn from dry-grown bush vines on the Powderbark vineyard’s ironstone gravel hilltop. With a focus on freshness, the fruit from these vines was picked with the potential alcohol sitting between 12.5 and 13 degrees—when the fruit is on the cusp of full maturity. The Mourvèdre was then pressed using a traditional, ultra-light Champagne cycle alongside a small percentage of bush-vine Grenache and a splash of Vermentino to bring subtle complexity and reinforce the freshness. The wine then rested on its lees for three months in neutral French oak. “On the notes - fresh fruit characters of strawberry and rose water combine with subtle complexity, including beeswax, Szechuan pepper and oyster shell. Textural and full-flavoured on the palate, yet finely balanced with a mix of rhubarb and pomegranate combined with fresh curd.  The finish is soft with refreshing pithy acidity and a bone-dry, briny finish.” Rob Mann, Winemaker

“On the notes - fresh fruit characters of strawberry and rose water combine with subtle complexity, including beeswax, Szechuan pepper and oyster shell. Textural and full-flavoured on the palate, yet finely balanced with a mix of rhubarb and pomegranate combined with fresh curd. The finish is soft with refreshing pithy acidity and a bone-dry, briny finish.” Rob Mann, Winemaker

"Perhaps it was inevitable that a stunning rosé would emanate from the celestial Mourvèdre vines at the Swinney vineyards in Frankland River. Well, this is it – and it is nothing short of breathtaking. I have never tasted a finer Australian Rosé, and it is all the more gripping that it is not made from Grenache!"
Matthew Jukes, The Buyer
“Swinney's exceptional mourvèdre in rosé form. It's a pale, dry and savoury style, feels concentrated in fruit character, spicy, and imbued with an interesting almost nutty/salty element that feels unique and compelling. Violet floral lift, red cherry, some faint game meat notes in bouquet and palate, too. Good textural experience in slinky, juicy upfront with some fine, powdery tannin to finish. Complex expression, is the takeaway.”
93 points, Mike Bennie, The Wine Companion
Swinney Mourvedre Rosé 2023
Swinney Mourvedre Rosé 2023
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Swinney Mourvedre 2022
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Swinney Mourvedre 2022

The positive results of Swinney’s meticulous viticulture are, perhaps, felt most strongly in the Mourvèdre. Just a few years ago, Rob Mann was utilising this fruit in Swinney’s Mourvèdre Syrah Grenache bottling. Such was the quality that it became harder and harder to dilute this fruit, and last year the team took the plunge and bottled a straight Mourvèdre. Syrah (6%) and Grenache (4%) make a reappearance in 2022, but it’s very much in a supporting role—this is still the Mourvèdre show. Swinney’s Mourvèdre is drawn from dry-grown bush vines on the Wilsons Pool vineyard which was planted in the early 2000s and has rich gravel/loam soils. The fruit for the 2022 was hand-picked over two days to optimise flavour and tannin maturity, then berry sorted and transferred to a single stainless-steel fermenter via gravity. A well-judged 20% whole-bunch portion was incorporated to highlight the “distinctive ferrous qualities, fine structure and wild spice” of the variety. This release spent 11 days on skins before being pressed to fine-grained, large-format French oak where it matured for 11 months.Mann finds a real synergy with Mourvèdre in a cool region and a warm season. Working with the conditions, he picked earlier than the previous year, preserving freshness, vibrancy and mid-weight appeal. According to Mann, Swinney’s Mourvèdre is the wine that best expresses the site’s signature ferrous, rusty nail character; a trait this winemaker values and pursues in all his reds. The fruit shows beautiful white pepper spice, a wild edge, savoury depth and textural richness.“This is a variety that is finding a safe, comfortable home in Frankland River. Lovely perfumed red fruits on the nose displaying a slightly earthy, dusty raspberry and light plummy character. The palate is soft and supple. It’s medium weight with a fine chalky ironstone thing treading through the palate. The cradle of tannins and fine oak, together with natural fruit energy holds a focussed long finish.” 95 points, rayjordanwine.com.au

“Deep magenta with purple hues. Wild fruits with an intoxicating mix of pomegranate, strawberries and satsuma plums mixed with some white pepper and cassia bark. Medium- to full-bodied with lashings of red and blue fruits. Sizzling venison and Chinese five spice complexity, finishing with a chalky, savoury, and finely detailed tannin structure.” Swinney

“Hoo ah! Here’s a wild wine of emphatic personality. Blue fruit, white pepper and exotic spice, but also bloody and ferrous too. I’m thinking blood plum, dried orange peel offering a pleasingly biter cinch, chalky and chewy, so much dried herb and liquorice-laced meaty spicy goodness, smudgy and ashen, but kind of vibrant too, with a meaty/grainy/sappy finish of excellent length. A terrific expression of Mataro.”
95 points, Gary Walsh, The Wine Front
“Superlative mourvèdre and certainly the leading light for the variety in Australia. Briny, chewy and gorgeous in its savory guise, this is a powerful expression bound to such a taut tannic fabric, underlain by spice and a tuft of dried herb, that there is not for a moment any excess of sweet fruit. Lots of chomp, depth and layers, oozing tapenade, saddle leather, sweet loamy earth, martini brine, menthol and violet notes, with raspberry bon-bon lurking. A wonderful wine deserving of serious praise and cellar time. Best after 2028. Screw cap.”
95 points, Ned Goodwin MW, jamessuckling.com
“This is a variety that is finding a safe, comfortable home in Frankland River. Lovely perfumed red fruits on the nose displaying a slightly earthy, dusty raspberry and light plummy character. The palate is soft and supple. It’s medium weight with a fine chalky ironstone thing treading through the palate. The cradle of tannins and fine oak, together with natural fruit energy holds a focussed long finish.”
95 points, rayjordanwine.com.au
“Deep ruby core with a vibrant purple rim. Blackberry pastilles, rosemary and nori aromatics. Ripe black fruits fill the core with deeper layers of iodine and boudin noir showing over time. Tannins are firm enough to carry the fruit weight and it rolls long to the dry finish. A little more time in the cellar will bring the components into closer harmony.”
90 points, Stuart Knox, The Real Review
Swinney Mourvedre 2022
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Swinney Mencía 2022
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Swinney Mencía 2022

This is just the second release of Swinney’s Mencía, and as was the case last year, we have very little. For now, there is just one row of vertically trellised Mencía vines in the north-facing part of the Powderbark vineyard, meaning Rob Mann can make just one hogshead a year. Plans are in the works for a new plot of staked vines on the highest, southeastern part of the same vineyard, but that’s a story for another day.The fruit was handpicked and gravity-fed to a single 600-litre open-top demi-muid. Mann favours 100% whole bunches for this wine, finding immense pleasure and intrigue in the resulting depth, structure, heightened spice and “almost curry leaf reduction”. And though he admits the style may be confronting, he’s resolute. Who are we to disagree? The wine spent 10 days on skins before it was pressed to an old, 300-litre French hogshead. It was then aged for 11 months before bottling.It’s no secret that Mann has an affinity for the high-altitude, granite-fuelled wines of northwest Spain and though similarities can be drawn, Swinney’s Mencía has an x-factor of its own. Emboldened by the warmer conditions in 2022, the wine has another level of depth and potency when compared to the 2021, which was born from a cooler year.It’s a wonderfully perfumed release, flush with berry fruits, summer florals and earthy brown spices. The palate is juicy, ripe and fleshy with perfectly pitched sweet and savoury balance carried on cranberry acidity and chalky tannins. The finish is long and quite mineral—it’s a beautifully crafted Mencía, a wine of intrigue and intellect.

“Dry-grown mencia. The bloody/meaty persona of the Swinney red wines continues. It’s absolutely hand-in-glove with the mencia variety here. This is ferrous, meaty, dark with fruit, toasty, graphite-injected, lifted by purple flower and red-black-jellybean characters, and gamey/meaty/rusty/smoky through the finish. It’s quite something. It’s characterful to say the least.”
93 points, Campbell Mattinson, The Wine Front
Swinney Mencía 2022
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“The scale of the vineyard, coupled with their pinpoint focus and pursuit of innovation, and the quality of the resulting wines, is truly extraordinary and inspiring” Young Gun of Wine, Inaugural Australian Vineyard of The Year 2020 

“There is a very bright future for Matt [Swinney] and Rob [Mann], and I have a feeling that these wines will gain a cult following in the UK just as they have in Australia, where many of these wines are sold on allocation only.” Matthew Jukes 

“Swinney is the complete package.”Max Allen  

“Swinney is flying.” Campbell Mattinson 

"There is no question that this vineyard and the style being crafted under one of Australia’s finest winemakers, Rob Mann, have redefined syrah and grenache. These are now the established benchmarks and should be on the buy-now list for anyone with an interest in contemporary Australian wine." Ray Jordan  

“Validation is faith’s greatest reward, and right now Matt Swinney is up to his eyeballs in it.” Nick Ryan, The Australian 

Country

Australia

Primary Region

Frankland River, Western Australia

People

Owners: Matt & Janelle Swinney

Winemaker: Rob Mann

Vineyard Manager: Rhys Thomas

Availability

National

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