Swinney

Game Changing Frankland River Born from Meticulous Farming Practices

The road from grape grower to winemaker can be fraught with difficulties. Yet, by building from the vineyard first, employing a dream team of passionate and experienced people, and never taking the focus away from quality, siblings Matt and Janelle Swinney have created something exceptional in the Frankland River region of WA.

It’s one thing to aim for the stars; it’s quite another to have the tools to get there. Matt Swinney had a powerful vision to establish a benchmark and unique vineyard on his family’s property, situated on the gravelly, ironstone soils of the Frankland. His intention was always to found a benchmark wine label using only the finest fruit, but good things take time—especially when it comes to vines! Most plantings occurred in 1998, and the site quickly garnered a reputation for quality and originality. Innovations such as planting bush vines (the first in modern-day WA, where they are virtually unknown) and taking the leap with Grenache and Mourvèdre (in a region that many felt was too cool for these Mediterranean varieties) certainly raised eyebrows. Today, both these decisions have proven to be inspiring.  

Fast forward to today, and the Swinney estate has become regarded by many as the finest Shiraz vineyard in WA, not to mention an excellent source for Frankland River Riesling. They have also staked their claim (pardon the pun!) as one of the world’s great sites for both Grenache and Mourvèdre—if you think we’re exaggerating, then we look forward to showing you the upcoming releases. More recently, in 2018, the Swinneys invited renowned winemaker Rob Mann to join the team. Mann is the grandson of the legendary Jack Mann—the godfather of Western Australian wine—and is internationally respected in his own right after his work at Cape Mentelle, Hardy’s Tintara and Newton in the Napa. By his own account, Mann took one look at the vineyard and asked, “Where do I sign on?”

“The Swinney vineyard represents modern viticulture interwoven with Old-World techniques, executed with precision through a combination of exhaustive manual work and state-of-the-art technology, and all underpinned by an environmental focus...and the quality of the resulting wines, is truly extraordinary and inspiring.” Young Gun of Wine – Australian Vineyard of The Year 2020

The Swinneys have been no less careful about who they entrusted their vines. Following celebrated viticulturist Lee Haselgrove’s tenure, in 2021 Rhys Thomas joined the team as viticulturalist and vineyard manager. A long-term buyer of Swinney fruit, Thomas has been walking the blocks and rows of the Swinney vineyards for over 15 years and was a leading force in the family’s drive towards pure quality and sustainability. His soil and aspect-driven approach will only further help peel back the layers of the Swinny’s outstanding terroir.  

Over the last handful of vintages, the Swinney label has been celebrated by critics worldwide in a way that is most unusual for such a young producer. Despite their sizeable holdings, the Swinneys produce very limited volumes of their own wine, cherry-picking a tiny percentage of their parcels for their own production. These vines are micromanaged to deliver the very finest and most expressive fruit they can grow. Mostly dry-farmed, the Swinney parcels are low cropped (at one to two tonnes per acre), and the canopy management is meticulous. There’s shoot and bunch thinning and shade cloth for the Shiraz and Riesling fruit, creating soft, dappled light and lower temperatures in the bunch zone. In the case of Grenache, the vines are harvested three times to pick only perfectly ripe fruit. Even then, the fruit is further graded depending on the wine it’s destined for. It’s an obsessive style of viticulture, and it shows in the wines.

The winemaking philosophy here is equally precise yet straightforward. Both Mann and the Swinney family want to reflect and preserve the personality of each individual vineyard site in that season. They want people to be reminded of the place rather than the maker. After careful sorting, fermentations are natural; Robb Mann also favours co-fermentation and the flavour and structural integration this brings. Gravity flow is utilised to avoid pumping, maximising the percentage of whole berries and minimising maceration. Mann is looking for an infusion-style, gentle extraction, and this approach goes a long way to explaining the remarkable balance and purity of the wines. The reds are aged in mostly seasoned wood, ranging from 500-litre demi muids to 36-hl wooden vats. The resulting wines are outstanding and shine with character, craft and respect for the land.

Swinny’s Farvie label represents the finest quality and purest vineyard expression from the family’s best, organically managed sites. These are wines made from specific vines and bunches, farmed in the kind of obsessive fashion that we associate with the most outstanding growers worldwide. The Farvie vines are rooted in the deep, gravelly, ironstone crests of the Swinney Estate’s upper, northeast-facing hillsides. The vines are exposed to the cool breezes off the river, and the prevalence of rusting lateritic gravel in the soil allows for excellent drainage and deep access to moisture. This specific soil type and aspect has been identified as delivering the purest earth-to-glass expression (described by winemaker Rob Mann as a ferrous or bloody note) and also providing purity, restraint and a noble tannin profile. Both the Grenache and the Shiraz are stimulating, cutting-edge wines born from skilful and fanatical farming practices.

The Range

Swinney Syrah 2022
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Swinney Syrah 2022

Over the years, Rob Mann has been steadily increasing his use of whole bunch in his red wines. This is especially true for his Syrah. By now you will know that this is a vigneron that seeks freshness, spice and structure in his reds—features he finds heightened in Syrah through careful use of whole bunches. Swinney’s 2022 Syrah was hand-harvested from select parcels planted to a range of clones, including 470, Waldron and Jack Mann’s heritage mass-selection Syrah. Unlike the Grenache and Mourvèdre, the Syrah is trellised—although there are plans afoot for some single-stake Syrah in the future. In the warmer conditions of 2022, Swinney’s shade cloth played a pivotal role, creating soft, mottled light to protect the skins and lower the temperature in the bunch zone as well as preserving freshness, spice and varietal and regional typicity in the fruit.In the winery, the berries were sorted and emptied into small wooden and stainless-steel fermenters via gravity. A well-integrated 28% whole-bunch component was included to build structure and texture, providing a robust frame for the lustrous Shiraz fruit. The 2022 spent 12 days on skins before being pressed directly to fine-grained, 600-litre demi-muids (7% new) for 11 months.

“Inky crimson-purple colour. Dark spice and brooding intensity with mulberry, Chinese five spice and squid ink. Medium- to full-bodied with saturated blueberry, satsuma plum and black pepper. Incredibly youthful and expressive with layers of flavour and texture underpinned by a fleshy, mouthcoating tannin structure carrying the fruit and spice into an enduring finish.” Swinney

“I looked at this over the course of 24 hours and fair to say that it transformed remarkably over that time. I wasn’t much of a fan on day one, so much so that I asked Gary to take a glance at it as well, which resulted in him using the descriptor “blood lip”, which was not only evocative, but deadly accurate. Blood lip. This wine tastes of blood and rust and iron. It’s a medium weight wine, smoky, meaty, sweet with roasted nut characters, peppery through the tannin as much as through the fruit, juiced with plum and red cherry but, as mentioned, bloody with it, ferrous, rusty, distinctive. It’s a dry wine, almost drying, but yet lengthy, and complex in shape as much as in flavour. In truth I disliked this wine, and then loved it. I’m not sure how that’s possible for the one same wine, but over the course of a day it was. As a result I’m recommending this wine, I think it’s excellent, but I’m also suggesting that it be given a decent-length decant.”
94 points, Campbell Mattinson, The Wine Front
“This is part of a triumvirate of wines that showcases the vineyard and winemaking that have crafted these super wines. This is not your fruit bomb Aussie shiraz. This is syrah and there is more than a little Old World style here. The fruit shows an almost luminosity that bursts from the glass. The palate picks up the vineyard characters with its ironstone gravelly rusty characters complementing the bright red fruits. You sense vineyard here with a deft touch of the winemaker simply coaxing a little more out of it.”
96 points, rayjordanwine.com.au
“A fine, mid-weighted syrah, reeling off scents of charcuterie, peony, lilac, clove and blue-fruit allusions, set in relief against a noble structural edifice. The tannins, often the masterstroke at this address, placate and suppress any stray fruit sweetness. Lovely strident tannins, doused in mace. Another wine to bury in the cellar for eight years or more, although drinkable now with a brisk decant. Screw cap.”
94 points, Ned Goodwin MW, jamessuckling.com
"The 2022 Syrah brings together a beautiful confluence of a lovely vineyard and a great season. Aromatically, we see sweet balsamic, blackberry, licorice, forest fruits, tea, steel, iodine and alpine herbs. This is a super wine, and I haven't even tasted it yet. On the palate, the wine is fresh and powerful. The tannins are pronounced but chewy and enlivening, with blood orange, saffron, a hint of sandalwood and blackberry. This is a really wonderful wine here, with the classic Frankland River splay of ferruginous tannin, rust and blood. It's super. Decant it; it will only get better, more svelte. 13.9% alcohol, sealed under screw cap."
95 points, Erin Larkin, The Wine Advocate
Swinney Syrah 2022
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Swinney Grenache 2022
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Swinney Grenache 2022

Back in the late 1990s Grenache was hardly known in Western Australia, let alone in the Great Southern. But with a love of top southern Rhône and Priorat wines, Matt Swinney had a hunch and planted the region’s first bush-vine Grenache vineyard. He did so with mass-selection cuttings from David Hohnen and gave his new vines pride of place on the Swinney site’s ironstone hilltops. Fruit for the 2022 Swinney Grenache was handpicked from the well-established, dry-grown bush vines on the Wilsons Pool vineyard’s rich gravel/loam soils. In the vineyard, each vine was passed over multiple times, ensuring only perfect fruit was harvested. In the cellar, the fruit was destemmed and sorted berry by berry. Fermentation occurred with 15% whole bunches in a combination of small wooden fermenters and stainless-steel tanks. The wine spent two weeks on skins before being pressed to a 3600-litre seasoned French vat for 11 months’ maturation.Having spent many years working towards it, Mann was delighted to finally have a large enough crop to conduct what he terms “a proper large-oak fermentation”. Combined with the dense core of flavour from the dry-grown bush vines, this practice highlights the lucidity and freshness that you find in Swinney’s Grenache fruit. Dark-fruited and spicy, with signature sinewy structure, Swinney is setting a new standard for Australian Grenache.

“Deep, lively crimson. Pure and energetic. Lavender, rolled tobacco, summer pudding and cinnamon. Medum- to full-bodied with intense raspberry compote, salted liquorice and fresh concrete. The wonderful acid spine carries the flavours and balance beautifully, and the tight-knit tannins provide the structure for a long and morish finish.” Swinney

"Fragrant, highly perfumed and thoroughly delightful opening of this bouquet. The fruit intensity is stunning especially when you consider the medium palate weight. It’s such a vibrant and pure expression of the vineyard with a distinct ironstone, grainy character evident. Lifted red rose petal fruits with a trace of raspberry brightness. A distinctly linear wine with a high chalky acidity. Love it."
96 points, rayjordanwine.com.au
“This is a return to form after the previous vintage, which I felt was a little charmless. A sturdy, full-weighted grenache that is far from the pinot-esque zeitgeist found in McLaren Vale. Here, more brawn, dark spice and tannic sinew. More Rhone-like, as effete as the comparison may be. In fact, it is the courageous tannins that build across a scape of kirsch, damson, dried sage, anise, and pickled orange zest, that serve as the wine's opus. A scruff of whole-bunch thyme and tapenade to conclude. This will make good older bones. A very sturdy grenache. Best after 2027. Screw cap.”
95 points, jamessuckling.com
“Distinctive wines from Frankland River. If I put my nose in the glass, and had to guess the grape variety, I’d maybe think it was Shiraz. Then again, I’m not very good at that sort of thing. Well, sometimes I am, but you know, modesty prevails (sometimes). Ripe raspberry, spice, floral perfume, black tea, liquorice and iodine. It’s fleshy and ferrous, ripe and quite earthy/bloody, with lavish crushed rock tannin, ginger biscuits, blood plum and orange peel, strewn with dried herbs and a closes with a firm dry chewy finish of excellent length. Distinctive wine. Very good.”
94 points, Gary Walsh, The Wine Front
"The 2022 Grenache is red fruited and lusty, with really entrenched fleshy fruit characters on the nose, and this translates fluidly in the mouth, where you find blood and pastrami, raspberry pip, red licorice, layers of pomegranate and ironstone, iodine and rust. This is a superb wine; it feels vast and open, rich and fresh. You can't fake this kind of fruit intensity; it's either in the vineyard, or it's not. And here, it is. 13.8% alcohol, sealed under screw cap."
96 points, Erin Larkin, The Wine Advocate
Swinney Grenache 2022
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Swinney Riesling 2024
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Swinney Riesling 2024

The key to understanding Swinney’s Riesling style is to appreciate the farming. All blocks are organically dry-farmed, the vines are cane-pruned and the row orientation is north to south. The team uses shade cloth in the Riesling blocks, protecting the bunches from excessive sun exposure and avoiding any roasted character in the fruit. Such precise vineyard management goes some way to explaining the wine’s purity and transparency. Then, Rob Mann’s search for structure and texture reigns supreme in the cellar. The fruit (from two of Swinney’s oldest blocks in the Powderbark vineyard) is pressed as whole bunches and ferments naturally in stainless steel with a high solids component. This approach “builds nuance and a saline core in the wine”, according to Mann. The wine then rests on lees in tank to preserve freshness and build texture before bottling. Vintage 2024 came early. It was one of the hottest, driest years on record, so Swinney’s meticulous farming methods were more critical than ever in ensuring pristine Riesling fruit made it to Rob Mann in the cellar. Despite the atypical conditions, Mann tells us the season delivered fruit of “tremendous depth and intensity with balanced, high natural acidity”.

Swinney Riesling 2024
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Swinney Farvie Mourvedre 2022
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Swinney Farvie Mourvedre 2022

This is just the second release of Farvie Mourvèdre, a wine crafted from a draconian selection of dry-grown bush vine Mourvèdre on the same kidney-shaped patch of dirt as the vines for the Farvie Grenache in the Wilson’s Pool vineyard. The vines here face northeast on leaner topsoil and with a higher percentage of coarse lateritic gravel; the roots have now made it down into the clay beneath. Meticulous fruit-thinning and selective hand-harvesting over multiple passes ensured Swinney achieved fruit as close to perfect as possible. Last year’s release fermented entirely as whole bunches. This year, the bunches and berries were smaller, requiring Mann to tweak the percentage (66%) to achieve the perfect balance. According to Mann, the Farvie Mourvèdre loves bunches: “It helps to balance the wildness, gaminess and rustiness of the fruit while accentuating the spice element of the wine.” Regarding the process, the wine spent 11 days on skins before being pressed to large, fine-grained, seasoned French oak vessels, where it matured for 11 months.As if last year’s wine didn’t set the bar high enough! “It might be my favourite wine I’ve ever made from Swinney,” says Rob Mann. “It’s so pretty; there’s a lovely natural balance and vitality that’s sometimes hard to capture. It’s pretty close to being a very, very good wine.”

“This wine’s fanfare is all-encompassing, with an epic nose that is striking, fruit-packed and sophisticated. There are abundant rose petals, plum and red cherry notes, and sensual waves of florality and bounteous juiciness are countered by intense, brittle minerality. The acid line scours the palate with masochistic striations that form the tramlines on which this wine delivers its message with tireless accuracy. And then you notice that something is missing. Unlike virtually every other mesmeric Mourvèdre on earth, oak is seemingly missing. Of course, this is an illusion because behind every cache of flavour molecules sits a silent oak nuance, hidden from view but doing the covert task of adding grandeur and detail without craving any credit. This is another jaw-dropping wine, and it stands a chance of running a longer race than the 2021, too, so be sure to secure your stock.
19.5/20, Matthew Jukes, matthewjukes.com
“The second iteration of this wine (tasted pre-release), which is quickly rising to icon status in Swinney’s portfolio. Tiny production from bushvines, the fruit is harvested in three passes wild fermented in whole bunches and matured in old oak. Currently tightly wound and holding its cards close to its chest, its starry journey ahead is clear. Vibrant, densely knit dark black plum aromas with a jewel-like clarity, along with violets, star anise, eucalypt, heady ferrous notes and crushed earth. Tannins might be tight and bunched up in their youth, but they are chalky and fine in structure, and the long line of delicate acidity helps deliver waves of flavour long after the last sip. Complex, vivacious and nuanced; a new Mourvèdre benchmark has been set.”
98 points, Cassandra Charlick, Decanter
“Dry grown bush vines, fruit-thinned and sorted; 66% whole bunch, 11 days on skins, pressed direct to a used 1600l French vat for 11 months. The fresh flavour profile introduces a savoury element to the dark berry fruits and a delicious lingering finish.”
96 points, James Halliday, The Weekend Australian Magazine
“This is the second vintage of the Farvie Mourvedre and takes the excellent ’21 up a notch. It has a dry, savoury and slightly ferruginous rusty nail character offsetting the sweet floral notes on the nose. The palate is a superb interpretation of the variety in these Frankland soils. There is a slightly greater volume of fruit than ’21, bit it retains the same Old-World charm and expression. Chalky tannins and balanced use of oak. Tasted this about 4 months apart and already the shy middle palate I first saw has started to unfurl. Energy and vibrancy set this apart. A worthy addition to the Farvie triumvirate.”
98 points, Ray Jordan, rayjordan.com.au
Swinney Farvie Mourvedre 2022
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Swinney Farvie Syrah 2022
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Swinney Farvie Syrah 2022

Farvie gives a remarkable expression of Australian Shiraz and puts Western Australia back in the conversation regarding benchmarks for this variety. Only a selected soil area in the Wilson’s Pool and Powderbark blocks is earmarked for Farvie Syrah, with the vines fostered to nourish and balance the fruit to optimum levels, allowing for dry farming. Swinney’s 2022 Syrah was hand-harvested from select parcels planted to a range of clones, including 470, Waldron and Jack Mann’s heritage mass-selection Syrah. In the warmer conditions of 2022, Swinney’s shade cloth played a pivotal role, creating soft, mottled light to protect the skins and lower the temperature in the bunch zone. The fruit was sorted berry-by-berry in the winery, and this year, Rob Mann increased the whole bunch component from 58% (in 2021) to 65% to further promote ethereal structure and lightness of texture while also encouraging bright, spicy aromatics. Everything was gravity-fed to a French oak vat and two demi-muids for wild fermentation. The wine spent only 12 days on skins before being basket-pressed directly to large, fine-grained, seasoned French oak, where it rested for 14 months before bottling. Mann fosters the Farvie plot’s innate savoury, ironstone and ferrous character, pushing it to take a lead role in the wine. Importantly, no new oak is used in the Farvie Syrah. “By using no new oak, you have to think a bit harder about how to build complexity, structure and perfume in Syrah,” explains Mann. “We build that complexity through viticulture, through bunches and time on lees. I think it’s another reason our Syrah is so distinctly different.”

“The colour alone stops you in your tracks because it is as near-black as possible, interwoven with ravishing midnight blue and sanguineous red tones. The nose seems to take its instruction from the colour, with a profoundly deep engine of malevolent, night-walker-style blackberry and black cherry tones, shot through with Swedish liquorice, fresh peaty soil and cracked black peppercorns. If Nosferatu, Voldemort, Moriarty and Sauron caught up on a day off, they would drink this wine. And given its freshness and purity, it wouldn’t leave them slow off the mark after their rendezvous because, for all of the awe-inspiring qualities in the glass, this is one of the most dynamic Syrahs on earth. Lividity and dynamism join forces to make this another remarkable declaration of the power and poise found in the great Frankland River terroir brought to the fore by inspirational winemaking.”
19.5+/20, Matthew Jukes, matthewjukes.com
“Dry grown on a vertical trellis, shade cloth intercepting the afternoon sun; 65%whole bunch; 12 days on skins; pressed to large format oak, 14 months maturation. The bouquet has warm spices, licorice and black fruits; superb mouthfeel, balance and texture, thanks to the shimmering tannins. Silk and satin rather than velvet.”
97 points, James Halliday, The Weekend Australian Magazine
“I think this has claims to be the finest Farvie Syrah yet in its relatedly short history. The colour is just brilliant and bright with a glowing purely crimson hue. Power, intensity and concentration delivered with such poise. Bright red fruits with floral dark cherry and a little black olive adds to its nuanced capture on the nose. The palate is sublime, almost perfect, in its structure, poise and delivery. The sweet natural fruits are balanced and aligned with the fine minerally, ironstone ferruginous characters. Continues to redefine the Australian varietal style.”
99 points, Ray Jordan, rayjordan.com.au
“Bright red, inky and opaque in the glass. Fabulously evocative in colour. Broodingly opulent aromas of mulberry, stewed satsuma plum, iodine, smoked meats, black pudding, licorice and Asian spice. Sheesh, there's plenty going on here. The flavours likewise are concentrated, plush and with a seriously firm drive of shapely, granular tannins and snappy, punchy acidity. Flavours are in the plum, rhubarb, and wild cherry realm, along with nutty, creamy oak, a brambly funkines and a ferrous edge. Built for the long haul—impressive gear.”
96 points, Aaron Brasher, The Real Review
Swinney Farvie Syrah 2022
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Swinney Farvie Grenache 2022
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Swinney Farvie Grenache 2022

In the late 1990s, Grenache was hardly known in Western Australia, let alone in Great Southern. But, inspired by the great wines of France and Spain—and believing that Grenache could do well in a region already building a reputation for high-quality Syrah—Matt Swinney ignored the experts (who said Grenache would never ripen in the cool climate of Frankland River) and planted the region’s first bush-vine Grenache vineyard. He did so with mass-selection cuttings provided by David Hohnen and gave his new vines pride of place on the site’s hilltops. Take a walk through Swinney’s untrellised Grenache bush vines, and things change about halfway down the block planted in 2004 on the estate’s upper northeast-facing hillside crest. The soil gets leaner and shallower, with more gravel and a higher clay content. “That’s Farvie,” says Rob Mann. This fruit is different, too; it is more ferrous and mineral with fine, velvety tannins and so much complexity. Vines are picked over multiple passes, with only the best bunches from each vine—those sitting in the dappled light of the vine’s architecture—set aside for Farvie.Once in the winery, the bunches are berry sorted, then gravity-fed to French oak for natural fermentation, incorporating 28% whole bunches. With Mourvèdre now a mainstay in the Farvie range in its own right, its inclusion in this wine has steadily decreased each year. This year, just 4% of Mourvèdre co-fermented with the Grenache (compared to 7% in 2020 and 14% in 2019). The wine spent 11 days on skins before being pressed to large, fine-grained, seasoned French oak vessels, where it matured for 11 months.

“Hand-picked, 28% whole bunches, berry and bunch sorted; 11 days on skins, then basket-pressed to used large format French oak for 11 months. Bright crimson-purple, the bouquet floral, the red and blue fruits and silky tannins on song.”
96 points, James Halliday, The Weekend Australian Magazine
“Now that Farvie is a trio, and not a duo, and the Mourvèdre sits neatly in between the Grenache and Syrah in terms of hue, timbre and attitude, this Grenache seems more succulent, fragrant and blushingly attractive than ever. It is imperceptibly lighter, more rhubarb and pomegranate-tinged and creamier than ever. The colour is a crimson and carmine amalgam, and the nose is akin to a stroll through an Amazonian arboretum. It is sexy, and it knows it, and before it gets too lascivious, on cue, it firms up, dries out and ends with a vicious lick of stern acidity. After such a lavish welcome, this finish is fantastic because it snaps your senses to attention and reminds you that while Farvie Grenache is a consummate charmer, beneath the surface, it is a weaponised wine with extraordinary skill.”
19+/20, Matthew Jukes, matthewjukes.com
“Nice to have this wine back in town after an absence in 2021. The power and concentration of the vineyard and the style is immediately evident. The intensity strikes immediately on the nose, while once the wine starts to roll across your palate you know you in a head zone of great power. It was a warm and concentrated vintage. Brilliant crimson colour with a bright luminosity and brilliant purity that lifts effortlessly from the glass. Floral notes with a dried herbie sage bush character engages immediately. Dry chalky tannins with a trace of minerally iron filings. It’s vibrant and fleshy with real volume of flavour. Continues to mark its turf as an Australian classic.”
98 points, Ray Jordan, rayjordan.com.au
“Deep red-purple colour with a bold aroma of spices and earth, toasty woodsy overtones and a (clean) meaty character. The wine is full-bodied and firm, with richness and good structure for ageing. Mouth-coating tannins and a chewy finish. Impressive structure for a pure grenache. A robust wine of character, that really should be cellared for best results.”
94 points, Huon Hooke, The Real Review
Swinney Farvie Grenache 2022
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“The scale of the vineyard, coupled with their pinpoint focus and pursuit of innovation, and the quality of the resulting wines, is truly extraordinary and inspiring” Young Gun of Wine, Inaugural Australian Vineyard of The Year 2020 

“There is a very bright future for Matt [Swinney] and Rob [Mann], and I have a feeling that these wines will gain a cult following in the UK just as they have in Australia, where many of these wines are sold on allocation only.” Matthew Jukes 

“Swinney is the complete package.”Max Allen  

“Swinney is flying.” Campbell Mattinson 

"There is no question that this vineyard and the style being crafted under one of Australia’s finest winemakers, Rob Mann, have redefined syrah and grenache. These are now the established benchmarks and should be on the buy-now list for anyone with an interest in contemporary Australian wine." Ray Jordan  

“Validation is faith’s greatest reward, and right now Matt Swinney is up to his eyeballs in it.” Nick Ryan, The Australian 

Country

Australia

Primary Region

Frankland River, Western Australia

People

Owners: Matt & Janelle Swinney

Winemaker: Rob Mann

Vineyard Manager: Rhys Thomas

Availability

National

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